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Each day, about 8,500 Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer. That’s a figure that doesn’t include the rest of the world, as more and more people suffer from melanoma, often when they least expect it. But when it comes to avoiding the disease, it’s not as simplistic as applying sunscreen whenever you go to the

A compelling new report from the Orange County Register profiled one such example of a person whose Down syndrome may have predicated future incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. Ruth Russi, who was born in 1959 with Down syndrome, was not expected to live past her fifth birthday. While manifesting the classical symptoms of the disease, she

This week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has rubber stamped a potentially revolutionary alternative to conventional treatment methods for opioid addiction. A possible answer to the growing epidemic of addiction plaguing the United States, the implant called Probuphine releases measured doses of buprenorphine from within the patient’s arm and has shown great potential in

The Canada-based study suggests that depression was the reason for the antidepressant prescription slightly more than half of the time, based on records from Quebec physicians over the past decade. When not prescribed for depression, antidepressants were prescribed to patients suffering from an array of conditions including anxiety, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, insomnia, migraine, obsessive compulsive

Following the Obama administration’s release of new electronic record keeping rules, union groups and other industry organizations raised their concerns about possible loopholes in the new OSHA rules on electronic record keeping. Chief among the concerns is how the rules allegedly don’t do much to improve worker safety. The rule published Wednesday by the Occupational

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Fentanyl works like heroin, and kills like heroin

With the United States still waging a losing war against opioid painkiller and heroin addiction, a relatively new threat is emerging in the form of fentanyl.

fentanyl

Fentanyl is a painkiller that first emerged in the 1960s, and is still mainly prescribed to cancer patients. It has been cited as a very effective aid to those who suffer from the disease, easing their pain much more effectively than patches and lozenges do. But the drug is also being made illegally and sold by dealers, giving users a much more intense high than heroin, yet ultimately proving fatal in many cases. And the Obama administration is wary of this threat, as both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Drug Enforcement Administration are warning of a severe, nationwide health crisis due to the rise of fentanyl.

Fentanyl-related deaths have jumped up dramatically in recent years, including in Maryland, where the death count went up from 58 to 185 from 2013 to 2014. Death count increases have been more egregious in Florida, where the number of fentanyl deaths went up from 185 to 397, but especially in Ohio, where the count multiplied over fivefold from 93 to 514, over the same timeframe.

Even tiny doses of fentanyl can be fatal, and when law enforcement officers seize the drug from dealers or users, they have to wear level A hazmat suits – the same super-high-protection suits worn by health care workers during the recent Ebola epidemic.

“Just micrograms can make a difference between life and death. It’s that serious,” said San Francisco-based DEA Special Agent John Martin. “All you have to do is touch it. It can be absorbed through the skin and the eyes.” He and other DEA agents are hoping to stop the flow of the drug and other related opioids, which have been killing more and more people since it was first sighted on the streets in 2007.

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Each day, about 8,500 Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer. That’s a figure that doesn’t include the rest of the world, as more and more people suffer from melanoma, often when they least expect it. But when it comes to avoiding the disease, it’s not as simplistic as applying sunscreen whenever you go to the

A compelling new report from the Orange County Register profiled one such example of a person whose Down syndrome may have predicated future incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. Ruth Russi, who was born in 1959 with Down syndrome, was not expected to live past her fifth birthday. While manifesting the classical symptoms of the disease, she

This week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has rubber stamped a potentially revolutionary alternative to conventional treatment methods for opioid addiction. A possible answer to the growing epidemic of addiction plaguing the United States, the implant called Probuphine releases measured doses of buprenorphine from within the patient’s arm and has shown great potential in

The Canada-based study suggests that depression was the reason for the antidepressant prescription slightly more than half of the time, based on records from Quebec physicians over the past decade. When not prescribed for depression, antidepressants were prescribed to patients suffering from an array of conditions including anxiety, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, insomnia, migraine, obsessive compulsive

Following the Obama administration’s release of new electronic record keeping rules, union groups and other industry organizations raised their concerns about possible loopholes in the new OSHA rules on electronic record keeping. Chief among the concerns is how the rules allegedly don’t do much to improve worker safety. The rule published Wednesday by the Occupational