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Each day, about 8,500 Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer. That’s a figure that doesn’t include the rest of the world, as more and more people suffer from melanoma, often when they least expect it. But when it comes to avoiding the disease, it’s not as simplistic as applying sunscreen whenever you go to the

A compelling new report from the Orange County Register profiled one such example of a person whose Down syndrome may have predicated future incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. Ruth Russi, who was born in 1959 with Down syndrome, was not expected to live past her fifth birthday. While manifesting the classical symptoms of the disease, she

This week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has rubber stamped a potentially revolutionary alternative to conventional treatment methods for opioid addiction. A possible answer to the growing epidemic of addiction plaguing the United States, the implant called Probuphine releases measured doses of buprenorphine from within the patient’s arm and has shown great potential in

The Canada-based study suggests that depression was the reason for the antidepressant prescription slightly more than half of the time, based on records from Quebec physicians over the past decade. When not prescribed for depression, antidepressants were prescribed to patients suffering from an array of conditions including anxiety, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, insomnia, migraine, obsessive compulsive

Following the Obama administration’s release of new electronic record keeping rules, union groups and other industry organizations raised their concerns about possible loopholes in the new OSHA rules on electronic record keeping. Chief among the concerns is how the rules allegedly don’t do much to improve worker safety. The rule published Wednesday by the Occupational

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Biotech firm gets thumbs-up to reverse brain death

Brain death may be considered irreversible, and death may be thought of as the end of it all, but a Philadelphia biotech firm has gotten green-lighted to attempt to reawaken the nervous systems of patients otherwise classified as clinically dead.

brain-death

An exclusive report from The Telegraph says that a total of 20 patients will be involved in the trial, which will be conducted in India. Over the next few months, Bioquark researchers will run a battery of tests on the brain-dead patients, and use several techniques, including stem cell injections, lasers, and nerve stimulation techniques. The subjects will then be monitored for a period of time, as researchers hope to achieve some sort of brain death reversal, particularly central nervous regeneration.

“This represents the first trial of its kind and another step towards the eventual reversal of death in our lifetime,” said Bioquark’s Dr. Ira Pastor in a statement.

“To undertake such a complex initiative, we are combining biologic regenerative medicine tools with other existing medical devices typically used for stimulation of the central nervous system, in patients with other severe disorders of consciousness,” he continued. “We hope to see results within the first two to three months.

Pastor added that Bioquark is looking for 20 qualified patients who do not have any religious or moral objections to the process, or any medical conditions that may prevent them from being feasible subjects.

Dr. Dean Burnett of Cardiff University’s Centre for Medical Education is not involved in the study, and told The Telegraph that the study may be promising, if still quite “farfetched,” given the current levels of medical technology and understanding of neuroscience. “Saving individual parts might be helpful but it’s a long way from resurrecting a whole working brain, in a functional, undamaged state,” he continued.

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Each day, about 8,500 Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer. That’s a figure that doesn’t include the rest of the world, as more and more people suffer from melanoma, often when they least expect it. But when it comes to avoiding the disease, it’s not as simplistic as applying sunscreen whenever you go to the

A compelling new report from the Orange County Register profiled one such example of a person whose Down syndrome may have predicated future incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. Ruth Russi, who was born in 1959 with Down syndrome, was not expected to live past her fifth birthday. While manifesting the classical symptoms of the disease, she

This week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has rubber stamped a potentially revolutionary alternative to conventional treatment methods for opioid addiction. A possible answer to the growing epidemic of addiction plaguing the United States, the implant called Probuphine releases measured doses of buprenorphine from within the patient’s arm and has shown great potential in

The Canada-based study suggests that depression was the reason for the antidepressant prescription slightly more than half of the time, based on records from Quebec physicians over the past decade. When not prescribed for depression, antidepressants were prescribed to patients suffering from an array of conditions including anxiety, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, insomnia, migraine, obsessive compulsive

Following the Obama administration’s release of new electronic record keeping rules, union groups and other industry organizations raised their concerns about possible loopholes in the new OSHA rules on electronic record keeping. Chief among the concerns is how the rules allegedly don’t do much to improve worker safety. The rule published Wednesday by the Occupational