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Scientists believe that the evidence of the amino acid glycine found around 67P/Chryumov-Gerasimenko may suggest comets emit life-giving agents, backing up previous studies that had made this assertion. The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft was able to detect several protein ingredients around 67P, including glycine, marking the first time that the amino acid was found

“We know that life started on Earth about four billion years ago, but the fundamental question is … why four billion years ago?,” said study co-author Vladimir Airapetian in an interview with Mashable. Could life have started one billion years ago, two billion years ago, (or) three billion years ago? Is there anything special about

The importance of New Horizons’ Kuiper Belt explorations cannot be understated. Pluto is, after all, technically located in the area, where a number of KBOs (Kuiper Belt Objects) are located. And since we know precious little about the region, any explorations New Horizons make going forward are potentially groundbreaking. And, according to the mission’s principal

Although SpaceX was able to successfully stick the landing earlier this month, when its Falcon 9 rocket was able to make it back and land on a drone ship, the company’s CEO Elon Musk suggests that the rocket had sustained a great deal of damage in the tricky, delicate process. As such, the rocket won’t

Scientists have finally come up with a way to create synthetic spider silk without having to deal with any trade-offs. And while it is definitely not the real thing, the new form of silk does accurately mimic the material’s properties, after numerous efforts in the past to successfully recreate the silk and ensure it remains

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Tailless comet is first of its kind to get spotted

In what has been described as a first in astronomy, researchers discovered a tailless comet, or, as scientist call it, a “Manx” comet. This is one celestial being that may provide the answer to many pressing questions about how the solar system had come about and evolved to what it is today.

tailless-comet

The tailless comet, which was given the official codename C2014/S3, got its more descriptive moniker from the tailless cat of the same name. Researchers noted that it is composed of rocky materials typically found near our planet. This in itself is a peculiarity, given that most comets are composed of frozen materials such as ice, and were formed in the freezing outer regions of solar systems. With this in mind, it is possible that the Manx comet was formed relatively near Earth before getting shuttled off to the outer regions as planets settled into position while our solar system formed.

Aside from the recently discovered comet, the scientists involved in the new study are interested in finding out whether the Manx comet is a one-off anomaly or if there are others of its kind. This could point to clues regarding the timeline when the planets in our solar system made it to their current formation.

“Depending how many we find, we will know whether the giant planets danced across the solar system when they were young, or if they grew up quietly without moving much,” said study co-author Olivier Hainaut of the European Southern Observatory in a press release.

C/2014 S3 was first spotted in 2014 by the Pan-STARRS (Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System), a network of telescopes designed to find fast-moving bodies in the evening skies. It was found with hardly a hint of a tail, about twice the distance of Earth from our Sun. According to study lead Karen Meech of the University of Hawaii, the tailless comet was found in perfect condition, hinting that it had been in the outer reaches of the solar system for quite a while.

“We already knew of many asteroids, but they have all been baked by billions of years near the sun,” she said. “This one is the first uncooked asteroid we could observe — it has been preserved in the best freezer there is.”

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Scientists believe that the evidence of the amino acid glycine found around 67P/Chryumov-Gerasimenko may suggest comets emit life-giving agents, backing up previous studies that had made this assertion. The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft was able to detect several protein ingredients around 67P, including glycine, marking the first time that the amino acid was found

“We know that life started on Earth about four billion years ago, but the fundamental question is … why four billion years ago?,” said study co-author Vladimir Airapetian in an interview with Mashable. Could life have started one billion years ago, two billion years ago, (or) three billion years ago? Is there anything special about

The importance of New Horizons’ Kuiper Belt explorations cannot be understated. Pluto is, after all, technically located in the area, where a number of KBOs (Kuiper Belt Objects) are located. And since we know precious little about the region, any explorations New Horizons make going forward are potentially groundbreaking. And, according to the mission’s principal

Although SpaceX was able to successfully stick the landing earlier this month, when its Falcon 9 rocket was able to make it back and land on a drone ship, the company’s CEO Elon Musk suggests that the rocket had sustained a great deal of damage in the tricky, delicate process. As such, the rocket won’t

Scientists have finally come up with a way to create synthetic spider silk without having to deal with any trade-offs. And while it is definitely not the real thing, the new form of silk does accurately mimic the material’s properties, after numerous efforts in the past to successfully recreate the silk and ensure it remains